NIH Features U Student Research

Water droplet suspended in an emulsion of olive oil, researcher: Valentin Romanov, mechanical engineering Ph.D. candidate, advised by Prof. Bruce Gale.

Water droplet suspended in an emulsion of olive oil, researcher: Valentin Romanov, mechanical engineering Ph.D. candidate, advised by Prof. Bruce Gale.

NIH – Snapshots of Life: A Flare for the Dramatic: Oil and water may not mix, but under the right conditions—like those in the photo above—it can sure produce some interesting science that resembles art. You’re looking at a water droplet suspended in an emulsion of olive oil (black and purple) and lipids, molecules that serve as the building blocks of cell membranes. Each lipid has been tagged with a red fluorescent marker, and what look like red and yellow flames are the markers reacting to a beam of UV light. Their glow shows the lipids sticking to the surface of the water droplet, which will soon engulf the droplet to form a single lipid bilayer, which can later be transformed into a lipid bilayer that closely resembles a cell membrane. Scientists use these bubbles, called liposomes, as artificial cells for a variety of research purposes.

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